Assassination and Commemoration

Assassination and Commemoration

JFK, Dallas, and the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza

Book - 2013
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Univ of Oklahoma Pr
The shots that killed President John F. Kennedy in November 1963 were fired from the sixth floor of a nondescript warehouse at the edge of Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas. That floor in the Texas School Book Depository became a museum exhibit in 1989 and was designated part of a National Historic Landmark District in 1993. This book recounts the slow and painful process by which a city and a nation came to terms with its collective memory of the assassination and its aftermath.

Stephen Fagin begins Assassination and Commemoration by retracing the events that culminated in Lee Harvey Oswald’s shots at the presidential motorcade. He vividly describes the volatile political climate of midcentury Dallas as well as the shame that haunted the city for decades after the assassination. The book highlights the decades-long work of people determined to create a museum that commemorates a president and recalls the drama and heartbreak of November 22, 1963. Fagin narrates the painstaking day-to-day work of cultivating the support of influential citizens and convincing boards and committees of the importance of preservation and interpretation.

Today, The Sixth Floor Museum helps visitors to interpret the depository and Dealey Plaza as sacred ground and a monument to an unforgettable American tragedy. One of the most popular historic sites in Texas, it is a place of quiet reflection, of edification for older Americans who remember the Kennedy years, and of education for the large and growing number of younger visitors unfamiliar with the events the museum commemorates. Like the museum itself, Fagin’s book both carefully studies a community’s confrontation with tragedy and explores the ways we preserve the past.

Stephen Fagin begins Assassination and Commemoration by retracing the events that culminated in Lee Harvey Oswald’s shots at the presidential motorcade. He vividly describes the volatile political climate of midcentury Dallas as well as the shame that haunted the city for decades after the assassination. The book highlights the decades-long work of people determined to create a museum that commemorates a president and recalls the drama and heartbreak of November 22, 1963. Fagin narrates the painstaking day-to-day work of cultivating the support of influential citizens and convincing boards and committees of the importance of preservation and interpretation.


Baker & Taylor
Recounts the events of the president's assassination and describes the creation of the Sixth Floor Museum in the Texas School Book Depository, a place of quiet reflection where the assassin himself once took aim.

Book News
In 1963, President John F. Kennedy was killed by shots that came from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository on Dealey Plaza. Author Fagin, associate curator and oral historian at The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, charts the process of deciding the fate of the building during a time when many wanted it destroyed, from the aftermath of the assassination through the building's purchase in 1970 by a Nashville music promoter, the opening of the sixth floor as a museum exhibit in 1989, and its addition to the list of National Historic Landmarks in 1993. Intended for general readers and students, the book offers 29 b&w historical photos and 10 historical and contemporary color photos. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [2013]
ISBN: 9780806143583
0806143584
Branch Call Number: 973.922 FAGIN
Characteristics: xxix, 238 pages ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Hunt, Conover 1946-
Linenthal, Edward T.

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StarGladiator
Dec 29, 2016

Just reflect for a moment how many books have been published over the past fifty plus years proclaiming // . . . retracing the events that culminated in Lee Harvey Oswald's shots at the presidential motorcade. \\ yet Lee Oswald was never, ever proven to have been at the scene nor holding the weapon that killed President Kennedy, nor the gun which killed Police Officer Tippit.
We do know of the endless connections in Dallas: the FBI Special-Agent-in-Charge, J. Gordon Shanklin, was at the FBI with the CIA's William Harvey and the CIA's man in Dallas, J. Walton Moore back in the 1940s, working together.
We do know that the head of the Dallas Secret Service office, Forrest Sorrels, was a very close friend to the corrupt and criminal, Gen. Edwin Walker, who virulently hated Kennedy, integration, et cetera.
We do know that the Deputy Chief of the Secret Service, Paul Paterni, served in the OSS [which in actuality accomplished exactly what during WWII????] with the CIA's head of Counter Intelligence, James Jesus Angleton, and they were both commanded by Clifton Carter, chief advisor to Vice President Lyndon Johnson, and whose brother, Gen. Marshall Carter, was the Deputy Director of the CIA.
We do know that the Assistant Deputy Director, Tracy Barnes, was a cousin and close friend to Allen Dulles, the fired director of the CIA [fired by President Kennedy].
We do know that Dallas Mayor Earl Cabell, was the brother to the fired Deputy Director of the CIA, Gen. Charles Cabell.
We do know that Secret Service Agent, Elmer Moore, who bullied the doctors at Parkland into accepting the false Warren Commission narrative temporarily [that JFK was killed from the rear], was related to Maurice "Tex" Moore, a partner in John McCloy's [Warren Commission] old law firm, and who had married into the Henry Luce family and sat on the board of Time and General Dynamics.
We do know that Lee Oswald's old boss, Robert Stovall [Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall] was the older brother of the DPD detective who went to Mrs. Paine's garage, Richard Stovall, which the Warren Commission's carefully orchestrated questioning of the two cleverly obfuscated, and that Robert Stovall gave good references for Oswald from downtown Dallas employers, but a bad one when the company was outside of the Dallas area.
We do know that Ruth Paine, who rented living space for Oswald's wife and daughters, had a sister who was career CIA, that her father, William Avery Hyde, knew George DeMohrenschildt [according to HSCA files from 1977-78], and that her brother was most likely a CIA asset.
We do know that her husband, Michael Paine, worked for ex-Nazi general, Walter Dornberger, brought to America by Allen Dulles under Operation Paperclip.
We do know that the acting Secretary of the Treasury that day, Gaspard d'Andelot Belin, was the brother-in-law of National Security Advisor, McGeorge Bundy, and a very close friend of Allen Dulles, allowing the Dulles kids to play on Belin's family tennis courts when they were growing up.
And on, and on, and on . . . .
But no one ever proved Oswald had anything to do with it.

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